Nature awakens to lock down

nature kōtare

In the current scenario we are in, it has become increasingly clear that nature is reclaiming its sovereignty. With many reports of animals coming back into areas that were populated with people. These are now becoming a safe haven for nature.

Here in Nelson, in my bubble I have really noticed an increase in native & introduced birds. With a number of pīwakawaka, kōtare (Sacred kingfisher), kererū and Silvereye popping up. There was a report of Kākā sighting in Motueka close to urban areas. Yes, we are at home more than we ever had, but I have worked from home and have not seen this much bird life before.


I have no doubt that with the lack of human activity, wildlife will feel less cautious and more confident in venturing more into urban areas. Unfortunately, there is a sad flip side to this with trapping of pests suspended due to lockdown giving reprieve to pest preying on our native birds.

What I want to touch on is, what impact do you personally have on your environment? What is it you do that alters the biodiversity, the ecosystem and the physical impact you actually cause?

The things you consume. The products you buy. Going deeper into the very actions of what impacts you have with the specific items you purchase. Do you consciously think about the impact of the product you buy on the environment or ourselves? For example, cleaning products, what is the composition of those products …. And then, what is that doing to our waterways when we flush them down the sink or toilet? The very ocean you eat your fish from, the ecosystem of the ocean is in danger.

It will be until we learn from the very small changes each person can make to provide positive impacts for the waterways. Don’t get me wrong, industry has a very big part to play in this. Although, if we make changes of what we buy and do this will have a trickle on effect up the line. Being self-aware puts the onus onto the big players to make a change.

All life on earth depends on a healthy ocean!

In current studies by the Ministry of Environment and supported by NIWA, water quality is dropping and becoming more acidic. How can we change this? Is industry pollution contributing? The graph below from Stats NZ Tatauranga Aotearoa is showing ocean acidity has increased 7.1 percent in New Zealand’s sub-antarctic surface waters.

Common paints and products use an ingredient called Sulphate grade Titanium Dioxide. This has significant waste that is poured into our ocean. Polluting waterways and the sea and affecting the pH levels of the water (which in turn affects marine life). The paint we use has a chloride grade. Which, yes this is more expensive, but it is more sustainable and uses recycling techniques; and is by far cleaner than the cheap easy alternative. This difference does not affect the quality and warranty of the paint I use.

We are well aware now how vitally important Wetlands are to the environment. With filtering and providing a solid ecosystem so why are they looked at as ugly infertile land?
We are already aware of the impacts being created around the world of water pollution, such as bleaching of coral reefs; let alone plastics floating around in the deepest parts of the oceans. It’s becoming common to having plastic particles consumed in the very fish you eat. Most plastics are petroleum based, which is not something you want to consume.


Unfortunately, something I am very aware of is the construction industry. One of the most wasteful industries around. The amount of by-product that goes into the skip from a building site is horrendous and will only be increasing the load in our landfills. The painting industry is just as bad with items such as masking plastics. We are actively pursuing & trialing different products. Watch this space as we have exciting developments ahead…. And then there’s the paint, again loaded with toxic chemicals as well as it being a plastic product (acrylic).

So as a consumer, I pose the question. What if we were to question what is it we buy? By studying the composition of what is in the ingredients and asking yourself, can I re-fill this? Can I use a more sustainable option? Can I buy locally? Is this ethically made? Is this harmful to me or the environment?

Thinking beyond our individual bubble and actively acting upon a will to change old habits into new, constructive and sustainable actions.
We need to make smarter choices, and luckily in the painting industry you can do that with Pure Eco Painting – decorating with chemical free products. Continuing to strive for a better tomorrow.

Look around you, leave a part of what you dearly love for your future generations to take the baton. Lead by example, that we can be guardians of this beautiful planet, not mere selfish consumers who pollute.